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  • “The active Test Run was aborted because the execution process exited unexpectedly”

    I just got this error when running a medium unit test suite (many hundreds of tests). “The active Test Run was aborted because the execution process exited unexpectedly. To investigate further, enable local crash dumps either at the machine level or for process vstest.executionengine.x86.exe. Go to more details: http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?linkid=232477 ” Anyone want to guess the problem is? It appeared in the output window, quite suddenly in an otherwise fairly happy and fairly TDD day. Hmmm
    Posted to Leaning Into Windows (Weblog) by Kathleen on Thu, Apr 10 2014
  • Roslyn (.NET Compiler Platform) should be a Black Box

    Compilers should be a black box. We all know this. We’re just in the moment of giddiness where we must consciously remember gravity and the physical laws of software. So let’s get real. Roslyn is an enormous step forward. I’ll say again that I believe the Roslyn release will go down as one of the pivotal moments in the history of computing. But it still should be a Black Box. “Can’t it be my favorite color?” OK, if you don’t like the idea of a black box, make it gold, rainbow or your favorite color
    Posted to Leaning Into Windows (Weblog) by Kathleen on Tue, Apr 8 2014
  • Language as Two Parts: Parser and Behavior

    I wrote here about Roslyn as a Black Box. There’s another layer to this that can be remarkably subtle. This isn’t actually the complete view. One thing that is missing is that the inherent nature of interfaces is anything can be on the other side. “Of course!” you say. “Anything can be at the top and bottom of your picture”. That’s true. But anything can also be in the middle. There’s no reason a composed compiler system can’t support multiple compilers, and variations. MSBuild scripts need a little
    Posted to Leaning Into Windows (Weblog) by Kathleen on Tue, Apr 8 2014
  • Roslyn (.NET Compiler Platform) As Open Source

    I’m really happy that Roslyn has been Open Sourced. But that’s because I trust that it will be an open source project where the teams at Microsoft retain enormous control. I have a couple of stories. The Conference Conversation At a bar at a conference last fall I tracked down a guy I respect enormously to convince him to join me in what I perceived at the time would be a battle for a specific language feature. Because of past parallel thinking, I thought this would be an easy sell. I recall having
    Posted to Leaning Into Windows (Weblog) by Kathleen on Tue, Apr 8 2014
  • Multiple Versions of EventSource and One Version of SLAB

    There are several versions of EventSource. .NET 4.5 has the initial version, which is improved in .NET 4.5.1. You want to use the 4.5.1 version if you possibly can. The diagnostics, in particular are significantly better. The CLR team has also done a pre-release version of EventSource on NuGet. This version has a couple of important features, including even better diagnostics and Windows Event Viewer support. That’s right, you have to use the latest and greatest NuGet version if you have events you
    Posted to Leaning Into Windows (Weblog) by Kathleen on Sat, Mar 22 2014
    Filed under: .NET, .NET 4.5, EventSource, ETW
  • How to Report .NET Compatibility Issues

    I got a comment on my blog this morning about a specific application breaking with a .NET 4.5.1 Security Update. I don’t see widespread reports of breaks in recent updates, but if an update affects you, it hardly matters that it’s not common. I wanted to get the email address up so folks can contact Microsoft directly when issues occur with .NET 4.5 compatibility, whether it’s via a security update or some other mechanism. The email address to report these issues directly to Microsoft is netfx45compat
    Posted to Leaning Into Windows (Weblog) by Kathleen on Mon, Mar 3 2014
  • Incorporating TraceSource and Other Techniques with EventSource

    I got a great question on ETW/EventSource/Semantic Tracing from someone watching my Pluralsight course on ETW and EventSource : I am going through your ETW training on Pluralsight. I like the content. Want to thank you for it. I want to embrace semantic logging and go all out for it. And I have a question: If I am developing on .NET 4.5/4.5.1, should I use just EventSource class or do you see any need for using TraceSource as well? This question emanates from the fact that there are two kinds of
    Posted to Leaning Into Windows (Weblog) by Kathleen on Mon, Feb 17 2014
  • Another Journalist Said Something Stupid

    In this article Paul Krill quotes the following statement: The language's placement was surprising because many software engineers have refused to migrate to VB.Net, the successor to the "well-beloved, classic Visual Basic 6.0 version," Tiobe said. It also was unexpected because Microsoft seems to have slowed down development of VB.Net. "For example, the latest Visual Studio version 2013 doesn't contain any new VB.net language features," Tiobe said. Yes, this is a quote
    Posted to Leaning Into Windows (Weblog) by Kathleen on Thu, Feb 13 2014
  • What does Blazingly Fast Tracing Mean

    I wrote a summary of ETW here and some basics here . I’ll be posting more to coincide with my new Pluralsight course on ETW tracing . ETW tracing is blazingly fast. The operating system tosses the trace work like accessing files onto another thread. It does this at a very low level allowing very, very fast tracing when tracing is turned on. If tracing is turned off, the performance hit is even smaller. But why worry about tracing turned off !?!?! The goal is creating a trace system you can leave
    Posted to Leaning Into Windows (Weblog) by Kathleen on Tue, Feb 11 2014
    Filed under: .NET 4.5, EventSource, ETW
  • Did No One Count?

    This is embarrassing, although I can explain, really officer. I wasn’t drinking, it just looked that way. I put up a Five Levels of Code Generation and it contained these bullet points: Altering code for the purpose of machines The path from human readable source code to machine language DSL (Domain Specific Language) Changing human instructions of intent, generally into human readable source code File Code Generation Creating human readable source code files from small metadata, or sometimes, altering
    Posted to Leaning Into Windows (Weblog) by Kathleen on Sat, Feb 8 2014
    Filed under: Code Generation, Roslyn, .NET 4.5, Metaprogramming
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